Sports

Actions

Report: At least 6 NCAA basketball programs to receive notices of allegations for violations

Notices will be sent this summer, per a report
Posted: 5:09 PM, Jun 12, 2019
Updated: 2019-06-12 20:15:18-04
March Madness: NCAA releases basketball bracket

At least six NCAA Division I basketball programs will receive notices of allegations for Level I NCAA violations this summer, CBS Sports' Dennis Dodd reported Wednesday.

Per Dodd, two programs will receive notices by early next month, and the other four will receive notices later in the summer. "The main thing is that we're up and ready. We're moving forward and you'll see consequences," Stan Wilcox, NCAA vice president for regulatory affairs, told CBS Sports.

Level I NCAA violations could include punishments as severe as postseason bans and scholarship reductions for one or multiple seasons.

At least three NCAA men's basketball programs -- Arizona, Kansas and Louisville -- are already reportedly under investigation by the NCAA.

Last week, former Arizona assistant coach Emanuel "Book" Richardson was sentenced to three months in prison following a lengthy FBI investigation into corruption in college basketball. The 46-year-old Richardson and three other assistant basketball coaches at major programs were charged in 2017 with abusing the trust of NBA-bound players by accepting bribes to steer them to favored managers and financial advisers.

In its victim impact statement filed in federal court, The University of Arizona said it is facing severe sanctions as a result of Richardson's actions.

Since the investigation began, Arizona basketball has been brought up several times, with claims that Richardson, aspiring agent Christian Dawkins and head coach Sean Miller were involved in discussing paying potential recruits, including Phoenix Suns center Deandre Ayton.

In the 2017-18 season, Miller claimed he never had a conversation related to paying Ayton.

On April 19, it was decided that Miller would not testify in the related bribery trial of Christian Dawkins and former Adidas consultant Merl Code. Both were convicted on bribery conspiracy charges. Miller has yet to be charged with a crime.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.