Valley woman struggling to recover after facing armed man at Mesa car dealership

MESA, AZ - Back in December, Robert Gourley was captured on surveillance video pulling a gun on workers at the USA auto in Mesa during a dispute over a recent purchase. The crime is over, but the pain remains for one former employee.

"I cried the whole night, and now I have nightmares," said Gaby Cadle. "I thought I am going to die." 

The video show Gourley pacing around the office cursing and threatening frightened employees. 

"A few minutes later he came to my office, and he had the gun sideways directly at me," said Cadle. 

Standing between Cadle and the door, Gourley pointed the gun directly at her face. 

That's when the account manager begged for her life with a simple request. 

"I told him I had cancer four years ago and I didn't die from cancer then, so I don't want to die now," said Cadle with tears rolling down her face. 

She says Gourley froze then put the gun to his own head. 

"I told Robert, please don't do that, life is short, it's not worth it for any material things to lose a life," said Cadle. 

Gourley's wife would eventually convince him to give up the gun. Police arrested him a short time later. 

But for Cadle, the damage was done. 

Traumatized, Cadle quite her job the next day.

But despite what took place, she couldn't get unemployment while searching for a new job. 

"The reason they denied me is because I quit, I couldn't believe it," said Cadle. 

Money is now tighter than ever. She starts a new job next week, but she's already lost her car and received an eviction notice from her apartment. 

At times, Cadles even struggled to put food on her table. 

"Crime can have long-lasting and devastating effects on people, and really the intent of this program is that you should not pay for your own victimization," said Jaime Watson with the Criminal Justice Commission of Arizona. 

Watson is referring to Maricopa county's victims' compensation program. 

If you've been a victim of crime, you may be eligible for financial assistance for things like medical costs, counseling, crime scene clean up and even lost wages. a

She says the process begins with the victim calling the County Attorney's Office. A coordinator will take over the case from there and request information like a police report. 

Giving the victim of a crime a fighting chance to be made whole. 

And while that assistance may help Cadle short term, the scars from that day she says may never go away. 

"I'm a different person now," said Cadle. "Thankful to be alive but changed forever."

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