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Preventing West Nile virus following a wet 2021 monsoon

Here’s Why Mosquitoes Love To Bite Some People But Not Others
Posted at 12:18 PM, Sep 22, 2021
and last updated 2021-09-22 15:49:53-04

PHOENIX — Monsoon 2021 has brought more rain to the state than we've seen in recent years. But, with all the rain comes more mosquitoes.

Health officials in Arizona are warning residents of a record high season for the West Nile virus following the wetter monsoon.

RELATED: Scottsdale man dies after suffering from West Nile virus

As of last week the state has seen 123 cases and four deaths due to the virus, which transmits through mosquito bites, according to ADHS.

The elderly community and those with weakened immune systems are more prone to neuroinvasive diseases that can be fatal when infected with West Nile, while most others who are infected don’t usually show symptoms.

RELATED: Arizona man paralyzed after contracting West Nile virus

Experts are offering tips on ways to fight the bite when it comes to mosquitoes.

You should use an EPA-registered insect repellent and make sure windows and doors that you may leave open have insect screens.

Long-sleeved shirts and long pants help keep mosquitoes away from your skin.

Protect your home by eliminating standing water where mosquitoes lay their eggs.

A small amount of water in a flowerpot, bucket, upturned children’s toys, or any other potential basin can become a mosquito breeding ground.

Standing water that can’t be discarded can be treated with larvicades that usually are available at the hardware store.

You should also try to keep your yard clear of debris to reduce places where mosquitoes like to breed.

RELATED: West Nile virus symptoms are similar to COVID-19 at first, experts say

West Nile virus was first detected in Arizona in 2003. People are infected through a bite from an infected mosquito.