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Maricopa County health officials reminding residents to continue precautions to slow COVID-19 spread

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Posted at 12:55 PM, Jun 11, 2020
and last updated 2020-06-11 20:50:12-04

PHOENIX — As cases of coronavirus continue to rise in Arizona, the Maricopa County Department of Public Health is reminding residents to do their part to prevent the spread of the virus, including always wearing a mask when going out in public.

Since the state’s stay-at-home order was lifted, the state has continued to see a pronounced uptick in total confirmed cases of COVID-19.

“We expected to see an increase in cases with more people out and about, but the rate at which cases are increasing is concerning. And, the thing is, we have the tools to absolutely slow our rate of infection if each of us does our part,” said Marcy Flanagan, executive director of MCDPH, in a press release.

Regardless of age or risk, Dr. Rebecca Sunenshine, the medical director for the department, says all Maricopa County residents should continue to do the following:

  • WHEN POSSIBLE - Avoid being in any setting with more than 10 people
  • ALWAYS - Keep at least six feet of distance from others when out in public
  • WHEN POSSIBLE - Limit contact with those outside of our household, especially if you are in a high-risk group
  • ALWAYS - Stay home when you are sick
  • ALWAYS – Stay home as much as possible when a household member has tested positive for COVID-19 except for work and school
  • FREQUENTLY - Wash hands with soap and water, and use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if unable to wash hands
  • ALWAYS - Wear a mask or cloth face covering when going out in public

Flanagan also said, “I can’t emphasize enough. It is not one tool alone that will help us slow the spread of this disease. It is only our collective efforts working together that will slow the spread."

As of June 11, there have been more than 30,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in our state and more than 1,000 deaths.