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New phone, text, and email scams top 2020 list!

Don't answer your phone!
Posted: 6:00 AM, Dec 16, 2019
Updated: 2019-12-16 09:22:29-05
SCAM: Age-old 'government grant scam' still duping victims

If you didn't get an unwanted phone call, an unsolicited text, or an email from an unknown place, raise your hand.

Well, I'm not there to see.

But my guess is none of you have your hand in the air.

They were the biggest scams of 2019, and they are only expected to grow in 2020.

Take the Social Security scam , for example, taking $20 million from us.

You're told there's some threat and they need your personal information.

If you don't give it, they threaten to arrest you.

Though no government agency will ever call you out of the blue and threaten you, this one is expected to be just as big next year.

Text scams will also be huge.

Did you get a text about selling your house though you had no intention of selling?

How about getting a text saying there are "fraudulent charges on your debit/credit card?"

And in many cases, the calls and texts look like they come from familiar numbers.

They are spoofed, and that will be a huge problem in 2020.

I advise not answering your phone unless the call comes from your contact list, even if it comes from our area code.

Also, don't click on any text or reply to any email needing something urgent.

Instead, contact the bank or business directly from a number or email address you know is legitimate and ask if there's an issue.

And in 2020, Facebook will likely still be the way many use social media.

You now even need to be careful when it comes to friend requests.

Some scammers are stealing photos and pretending to be people you may know.

And you may just blindly click on accept.

But that means in some cases, the person has access to your friend's list.

Soon after, the scammer may send them private messages with weird offers.

If you're asked to wire money, buy gift cards, or give out Social Security and credit card information to callers, texters, or emailers, assume it's a scam.

That should keep you safer.