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Easley's Fun Shop in Phoenix to close after 72 years

Easley's Fun Shop to close after 72 years
Easley's Fun Shop to close after 72 years
Posted at 1:27 PM, Apr 08, 2018
and last updated 2018-04-10 09:40:15-04

After seven decades in Phoenix, Easley's Fun Shop, known for its magic tricks, costumes, and accessories, is closing.

Easley's announced the news last Friday in a post on its Facebook page, which has since been met with hundreds of comments from people sharing their experiences and memories of the business over the years.

"Dear Friends and Family;

After 72 years of being a family business, we have decided to just be a family. This will be our last Halloween. Thank you for all your love and support over the years. We have loved being part of your lives."

The Easley Family

According to its website, Easley's years-long business started in 1947 when Bert Easley, a Vaudeville Magician, opened a magic shop in downtown Phoenix. As the store evolved and grew, novelties, gag gifts, costumes, accessories, and make-up were added.

It has remained family-owned -- spanning four generations -- since the website said.

“It’s sad. I’m heartbroken, honestly, I’m heartbroken but then there’s another part of me that’s relieved,” said Debbie Easley, General Manager of Easley's. 

Easley says they’ve seen more foot traffic at the store but not so many sales and while she doesn’t blame the internet entirely, as there were several other factors, she says online shopping changed the game for them and says they’re not very in tune with keeping up with the internet or managing a store online.

“I’m not going to say that online put us out, I’m gonna say I think that business is changing,” Easley told ABC15. 

The 15,000-square-foot business is hard to miss near McDowell Road and 7th Avenue with its bright yellow facade, and painted murals.

"You have been such a fun part of my family's lives for decades. We will be sorry to see you go. And, you have been a good neighbor and wonderful member of our downtown community. Thank you and good luck," one person wrote on Easley's Facebook page.

"I’m so sorry to hear this. You really brought something unique to the valley and your family business represented something that has become a relict in today’s high tech world," wrote another person.