Arizona wildfire: Doce Fire burning near Prescott

PRESCOTT, AZ - LATEST UPDATES: http://bit.ly/14iH5kr

A wind-fueled wildfire that broke out Tuesday morning in the Prescott National Forest grew to 5,000 acres in a matter of hours.

The Doce Fire, sparked on the west side of Granite Basin Road around 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, was believed to have grown to over 7,000 acres as of Wednesday morning, but those figures were later amended to just over 5,000 acres.

According to U.S. Forest Services spokeswoman Noelle Fletcher, there were no new evacuation orders issued overnight.

The fire was calmer overnight, which is typical fire pattern, Fletcher said.

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Air15 video showed wind whipping the flames and sending thick smoke into the air Tuesday afternoon and into the evening. The fire is currently at 0 percent containment, Fletcher confirmed.

More than 500 firefighters and crews members are on scene battling the blaze, along with heavy air tankers and numerous large helicopters. Air15 video showed a DC-10 air tanker spending several hours Tuesday afternoon dropping retardant on the flames.

Fletcher said no structures have been lost, and no injuries have been reported as of early Wednesday morning.

Several hundred homes have been evacuated, including those in the subdivisions of American Ranch and Sundown Acres. Earlier Tuesday, evacuation orders were issued in the Granite Basin and Iron Springs Club areas.

Those forced to evacuate are being asked to seek shelter at the Yavapai Community College gymnasium.

More than 900 Bagdad residents were without power for several hours due to the smoke. Power was eventually restored around 9:30 p.m. Tuesday night.

Andrews said the fire has seen a rapid spread due to extremely dry conditions combined with high wind speeds.

Flames initially sparked northwest of Prescott, and have since progressed east, fueled by breezy conditions. Andrews said the mix of grass, sparse brush, chapparal and pine trees has also slowed containment efforts.

The fire is believed to be human-caused and is currently under investigation.

A Type 1 incident management team has been called in from the southwest region to take control of the fire fight beginning on Wednesday. Type 1 teams are the most advanced firefighting crews, which include federal resources.

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