Valley families celebrate rare 'Thanksgivukkah'

SCOTTSDALE, AZ - Several Valley families are celebrating twice this holiday this week-- as Hanukkah and Thanksgiving overlap for the first time in 125 years.

"Thanksgivukkah" is a chance for families to combine both traditions and they're getting creative.

Hanukkah at the Brooks' house is a family affair.

"We're making our holiday potato latkes. They're a traditional food for Hanukkah, because they are cooked in oil," said David Brooks.

This year oil is the main ingredient for two traditions rolled into one.

"The first night of Hanukkah will not co-coincide with Thanksgiving for another 70,000 years," said Emma, David's daughter.

"Thanksgivukkah" means latkes will be served alongside turkey and for many families, the guests have doubled.

Jennifer and David whipped up dinner for 23. Their daughter Emma pitched in to help decorate.

"So we have our turkeys that we made as an art project, they're playing with dreidles or gelt," Emma said.

Wednesday night, they lit one candle for the first night of Hanukkah as they carried on a family tradition.

"It was my great-great-grandmother's menorah. And so we bring that out every year," Jennifer said.

But this year it has a special twist.

"My husband was trying to find a way to line up all the turkeys we made and make it into a menorah, but we figured we'd probably burn the house down," she said.

For the first time on Hanukkah, three generations filled the Brooks' home from both sides of the family.

Together, they learned more about the two holidays that so rarely come together.

"So it's fantastic to celebrate both holidays in a single night and make it a very special Thanksgiving and a very special Hanukkah," David said.

On the tables, turkeys sit next to menorahs. And families play games of dreidels after their "Thanksgivukkah" dinner.

"You have one chance to do this, it's a unique thing, I never even thought it could happen!" David said.

It's a "Thanksgivukkah" celebration they'll never forget.

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