Drought begets drought, but this is ridiculous

It's no secret Texas is experiencing a serious drought.

More than 90 percent of the state is experiencing some sort of drought condition. A fourth of the state is experiencing an exceptional drought -- as bad as it gets.

 

So when Texans hear of rain, it's big news.

Rain was forecast for most of Texas through the Memorial Day weekend, and it wasn't coming quietly. Severe weather was expected in southwest Texas nearly every day of the weekend.

Normally, residents would dread a rainy Memorial Day weekend, but not this year.

These storms showed up on time and made their presence known. In all, there were 84 reports of severe weather over the weekend, more than any other state.

With some of these big storms, heavy rain fell. Some places received close to six inches over the three day period, but at the other end of the spectrum, others received little to none.

This left a lot of residents wondering, "Why not us?"

Thunderstorms are fickle creatures. It takes a lot of little ingredients coming together just right for a thunderstorm to form in the first place. Storms will form and travel along the path of least resistance, where conditions are most ideal.

This is why thunderstorms will sometimes form just west of a city and then split, going north and south of a city that desperately needs the rain. In this case, conditions were better around the city opposed to inside it.

 

Things like this happen in the meteorological realm all the time, but we may not always notice. During times of drought, everyone pays closer attention to the weather patterns, especially rainfall.

In the meantime, drought-stricken areas will keep watching the weather even closer and celebrating those precious few raindrops when they occur.

Follow Storm Shield Meteorologist Jason Meyers via the Storm Shield app on twitter, @StormShieldApp and Facebook. Download the Storm Shield Weather Radio App for your iPhone or Android device and get severe weather alerts wherever you are.

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